How Pi Works

Pi measures research respondents' answers to an attitude questionnaire. The quantitative responses are then 'indexed' against total population.

Pi’s methodology is compatible with a wide range of consumer research systems.

Data for use with Pi can be sourced from a wide range of consumer data sources.

How The Pi-ChartTM Reveals Key Attitudes

The Pi-ChartTM is a “mind-map”, showing eight color-coded attitudinal “zones”.

The zones are assigned names, each summarizing a group of attitudes. The zones are organized so that logical opposites are on opposing sides of the graphic. Each of the eight attitude zones is made up of five specific attitude “descriptors”, each assigned a name.

The structure of the Pi-Chart is completed by adding in a series of concentric circles, representing a numerical scale from 0 to 200. Each of the radii of the circle represents a range of possible index scores from 0 to 200.

An attitude score above 100 means that the group is over-represented on that attitude compared to total population.  An attitude score below 100 means that the group is under-represented on that attitude. The Pi-Chart shows this via a series of concentric circles. A point falling OUTSIDE the red circle means an above-average score for that descriptor.  Any point falling INSIDE the red circle represents a below-average score for that descriptor.

Click here to see a sample Pi-ChartTM

 

Methodology & Samples

Pi measures research respondents' answers to a special proprietary attitude questionnaire. The quantitative responses are then 'indexed' for any identified consumer group against the total measured population.

Sample size needs to be big enough that individual question responses are based on at least 50-100 respondents.

Pi and the Pi-ChartTM have been engineered to work with a wide range of existing market research sources. Data from major multi-national single-source surveys, where the questionnaire includes a substantial number of attitudinal questions, is particularly well-adapted to the Pi analytical approach. Other forms of market research, whether syndicated, sector-specific or proprietary, may be compatible with Pi methodology.